here. in spirit, that is. {and a recipe box}

{For anyone that is reading Almost Amish, please feel free to still comment or email me, your opinions.  I so appreciate those of you who have shared and I would love to hear from the rest of you}

***

Hi everyone.
I haven't been around much this week and I really think that it has something to do with the book we are reading, together.
It's hard for me to read something and not begin to immediatly begin internal reflection.  It's such a interesting book, in that sense.  I can't put it down and although I don't think that some of the changes Sleeth recommends will be ones we implement, the overall premise is getting to me and I am doing a lot of thinking {Not in a "I don't want to blog" way but more in a "I need to be quiet in order to hear" way}.

Because of this, I feel less pressure and intent on doing so many things a day and a strong pull towards resting in the moment.  Personally, I've been working on this and in actuality, becoming much better at it.  I'm finding that I approach the end of my day and I'm satisfied with things I did fully, rather than things I finished.  This concept has taken me a long time to adjust to, being a type-A, go getter. At one time I would measure accomplishment by the amount completed, rather than the quality therein.

With this said, I have to admit that this book is taking a toll on me.  It's challenging my mind to deliberate, when making daily choices.  I've been letting it ruminate and choosing to write with intention, not just write because it's a new day {also a habit of mine}.  So, that is where I am and I wanted to share because I do enjoy my daily interactions with you and have missed them but am also enjoying the room to really let her words seep in and take root.

***

I also wanted to share something I found at an estate sale and would love to pass along to someone.
On one of my recent journeys to estates, I found a small recipe box.
Modest in structure, materials and composition, it sat alone, on the kitchen sink.
You know that people walked right by it, opened it and then shut the top and moved on.


I can tell you right now that this isn't exactly the gold mine of estate sales.  It's not even something that most estate sale shoppers would take, it if was free.
But I would.  And I did.

Because inside this box is years of someone's life, in the kitchen.  Who knows what these recipes were used for?  Which ones were good, which ones were flops and which were her favorites.
Her handwriting is all over this sweet containers contents.  Time spent, sitting at a kitchen table. She wrote out hundreds of ingredients.  She clipped sweet, small pieces of the newspaper, magazines and circulars.

It's full of time, memories and love.
Left on the counter.
Until I saw it, captured it and brought it with me.

And I know that one of you would love it, use it and treasure it.
Please tell me why you want this sweet box and I'll send it to one of you.

I won't play favorites, promise.

It just needs a home and I want to find it one.

Happy Thursday, friends.
I hope your day is beautiful.


21 comments:

  1. First of all just looking at that sweet box brings tears to my eyes..because you can't find boxes like that anymore. And you especially don't find handwritten recipes anymore..
    I just seen a craft on Pinterest where they took grandma's handwritten recipes and framed them and hung them as decor..and that is definately what I would do with a couple in that box...of course after I sit and rummage through the whole thing wondering how many times she cooked a certain recipe..or which one was cooked the most. We don't have alot of estate sales here in Arkansas ...but I would sure do what you do if we did have them! OK..that was long...but the point is ...I LOVE THAT Old Worn Timeless modest container!!
    And I am with you on the blogging because you "have something to say" not because it is a new day and you have to blog something every day.

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  2. Normally, I would have rushed to the head of the line, begged, and paid the postage to get my hands on this. I started teaching myself to cook when I moved to New York and am always seeking out old recipes, and have a small but efficient collection of vintage cookbooks – but, seeing as I'm all about the minimizing at present, I don't think it makes sense to seek out something that is only going to end up in storage for a year.

    So, to whomever it goes: Think about starting a weblog of the most interesting of these recipes. Scanning them or typing them up and passing the gift of a find like this onto many instead of one. Maybe outsource testing to followers of the weblog. A global Test Kitchen if you will. Just a thought.

    (Oh, and then give it to me in a year!)

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    1. Yeah.
      Give the recipe box to Russell and give me the credit, when the Global Test Kitchen is made into a movie!

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    2. believe me if the box goes to me..i will definately be cooking the recipes..
      and scanning them in and posting is a very good idea.i do hope whoever gets it..does that so we all can enjoy the goodies inside!! I just love the box itself and the handwriting..it reminds me of my grandma!!

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  3. What a treasure! I love vintage...especially if it tells a story. It would be a blast testing out those recipes!

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  4. Does it smell like Grandma's kitchen? Seeing the handwritten recipes gives me a scent reaction. I have some handwritten recipes my Grandma wrote out and mailed to me - one for refrigerator pickles. On the back it says "they aren't that hard to make. You'll be fine." Now that she is gone, when I get the recipe out to make pickles I hear her voice or reassurance and smell her kitchen. It's a neat piece of paper to have.

    I can't understand why that beautiful box wouldn't have been valuable - I would have paid a dollar for the box alone. I would love to nose through the box and try the recipes. To hold a piece of paper in my hand that was lovingly written so long ago, instead of scrolling them on pinterest from my ipad.

    What a neat find.

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  5. Plain and simple... it reminds me of my grandmother and I miss her dearly. There is something about hand written recipes that brings about a sense of comfort and a reminder of simpler times. What a fantastic find!

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  6. One of my favorite possessions is my grandmother's recipe box. My dad will flip through it and ask me to make something he remembers from his childhood and my heart clenches every time he hands me the yellowing index card in my Nana's scrawl. I can't remember her voice but still, she's speaking to me. I love this and realize what a treasure recipe boxes are. They're one of my favorite vintage finds.

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    1. I know what you mean, Sarah! My Grandma C. left me her recipe book. (my sisters got the fancy diamond rings, but I got this, and I realized that that was what she thought I would want more. We spent almost every Sunday afternoon either baking, crocheting, or knitting.). It was just a black leather notebook that she wrote her recipes in, but over time she stuffed it with clippings and recipe cards. When I make one of her recipes it is like we are together again, her teaching me and me trying to soak her up.

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    2. That's beautiful, Mary. I love that! Those are such special memories. It makes me think about what we're going to leave our children. Pinterest? Blog references? I'm going to start being better about writing recipes down. My husband writes notes in the margins of our recipe books and the dates that he cooked them. His mom did it too and I think it's a sweet tradition.

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  7. I have one that looks just like this! My mom has one, too, and after years of looking recipes up in hers for holiday baking and such, I begged her to buy one for me if she ever saw one in her weekly garage sale hunting. I love it. I love how it looks, how it is put together, and how it connects me to some other woman's recipe traditions and my mom's, too. Choose carefully, Rachel! Send it to a good home. :)

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  8. What a treasure...I was just ironing some vintage linens this afternoon thinking how we don't really have lovely things like these to pass along to our grandchildren someday. It's hard to imagine a Swiffer sweeper, Keurig, or rubber-handled ice-cream scoop being of much interest to a collector in any era. (Well, maybe someone in colonial times would have been quite taken by the idea of a Keurig!) I try to stay in the habit of using paper and pen as often as possible. How sad to think of my future granddaughter receiving a cd full of typed recipes as a momento when I pass away! Or for the only love letters shared between my husband and me to have been stored up in an email folder. Actually, I'm sad to think that someone in her family didn't see fit to cherish this woman's hand-written recipes. I'm glad you have an eye for such a sweet item, and I would love to call it mine!

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    1. i feel the same way! I have a notebook that I bought from dayspring that has a Mr and a MRS side..and that is what my husband and i write letters to each other in..and i know that is something my daughter will cherish. Technology is a great thing..but sometimes we still need to be "real"

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  9. I agree with Kate! So thankful for you and your heart for rescuing such treasures! I am finding myself thinking of you often when I am treasure hunting...your passion is rubbing off on me!

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  10. So it's decided then – the box goes to Russell! Oh, wait …

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  11. I have some recipe cards both from my grandma and my mom in their own handwriting, that sit in a baggie up in a cabinet by a favorite cookbook--I just have never seen a box that captures the essence of my mom and grandma's past. . .this one would work though: ) I can feel it: )

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  12. Simply beautiful . What a priceless gift to have handwritten recipes from long ago . I would adore & cherish this ... It would have a good home with me :) .

    Shelly
    Shellybellyfoster@gmail.com

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  13. I watch American Pickers on the History channel and I'm always amazed (and so sad) at all the family has left behind as trash or for the taking. I'm not talking about "things" but a wedding picture framed with her veil from the early 1920s. I think maybe they don't have family to pass it down to I guess? Maybe that was the case with this box, but I love all the history kept inside there with food instructions and love. It's inspired me to maybe put some of our family favorites into writing instead of keeping them digitally on Pinterest or Evernote.

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  14. I was given my Nanny's (grandmas) recipe box when she passed away & I've cooked a few of her recipes. Seeing her sweet tiny cursive on those handwritten recipe cards brings joy to my heart and tears to my eyes. I'm a sucker for all things handwritten :)

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  15. it does make me a little sad that someone in this persons familiy over looked this. i have a few recipies in my grandma's shaky handwriting that i need to put into my scrapbook. even she has started putting her recipes onto her computer. she did print them out in binders for christmas presents last year, but there is still something special about that personal touch

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  16. I love the simplicity of the little dovetail joinery, the soft, worn color of the finish, and the handwriting on all of the foxed recipe cards. SO many grandmas have that same handwriting, it seems. My own did, that's for certain. She passed away when I was nineteen; my grandpa left us two years ago, a month after my son was born. I don't think I deserve your little treasure any more than any one else, but if it came here, I know it would remind me daily of those sweet folks. Grandpa used Grandma's recipes for a decade after she passed; one of my aunts has them now.

    It's a lovely, nostalgic find. Thanks for sharing it with us!

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